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Knitting Equals Pleasure, Despite ME/CFS

Jody Smith loves knitting. Again. She thought her days of knitting and purling were long over but … she’s back …

pixabay-knitting-2

A dozen years ago I was so decimated by ME/CFS that I couldn’t read, watch TV, or flip through a magazine. My days were spent zipping back and forth along the spectrum of waking and sleeping.

I was wide awake staring at the ceiling, undulating with a seasick vertigo and parasthesia. I was fitfully in and out of sleep. I was sleeping deeply for long and irregular hours, waking sometimes in the middle of the night, in the middle of the afternoon, in the evening … interesting that rarely did I wake at a “normal” hour of the morning.

And then there was the so-called waking state that was so typical of that time for me, where I was conscious but devoid of conscious though, unable to have or understand a conversation, unable to do anything. Anything at all.

After some months of this I became more awake and aware of my surroundings. And I became so bored during the empty hours of the empty days that I sometimes wondered if this was any better than the mindless days of somnolent existence I’d just left.

I really needed something to do but the big hurdle was coming up with something I could do without crashing after 10 minutes and losing the tiny, precious ground that had taken so long to gain.

Reading had always been my habit when I needed something to fill my time. Couldn’t do that now. Had tried crossword puzzles — which was a hilarious idea when you think about it. Why would that be easier than reading? It wasn’t.

Television and radio was out. Just completely out of the question. So now what? I stared out of the window from my chair in my bedroom, but I live in a quiet cul-de-sac and the only activity I saw most of the day was performed by the squirrels running from tree to tree.

One day it occurred to me that maybe I could knit. Fortunately I’d learned how some years before. One thing was for certain, I was in no shape to try to learn anything new. It had to be something that (hopefully) would be automatic, a skill I’d already mastered. As long as I hadn’t forgotten how, knitting was a real possibility.

I dug out needles and yarn and started knitting, or actually I started purling. For those of you who knit, you’ll know this will create a different kind of texture than knitting. For those of you who don’t knit … forget about it, it won’t affect the story.

I could not have followed a pattern, didn’t bother with a guage (again, non-knitters, forget about it). I just started in, and hoped that it wouldn’t end up as a tangle of snarled yarn. A couple of false starts, though, and I was in business. At first I could only do it for a few minutes, then had to go to bed. Worn out brain, and sore hands. Had to recuperate.

Over the next month, though, my body and brain made their adjustments and I was knitting (okay, purling) for hours at a time. By the end of that winter I had created eight panels that were each six feet long, which I stitched together to create an enormous, lumpy blanket.

Nobody ever used it, to my knowledge. But that had never been my intention in the first place. My goal was to do something that helped quell the mess in my head and made me feel like I was making something happen, and that my time was doing something more than just leaking away.

Eventually I unravelled most of this blanket and used it for other projects when I was feeling better a few years later. I kept one panel which I made into a scarf for my 14-year-old daughter at her request.

I have knitted off and on since then. There would be years when my hands and arms were too sore and crippled and my supplies gathered dust. The last time that happened, several years ago I was afraid I was done for good.

But last winter I made over an old sweater of my husband Alan’s for our dog Cleo. She’d hurt her hip, which is especially unnerving when it happens to a dog with only one remaining back leg. I’d read that keeping it warm when outside in the winter might help.

So Cleo ended up with two doggy sweater vests that were long enough to cover that hip. One was brown, made from Al’s sweater. The other was dark green, revamped and reknitted (knitting and purling, this time) from a sweater I’d started five years earlier and had become too crippled to finish.

All of this was enough to make my fingers eager to get creative. I was careful to start out (as I do with everything) only spending 5 to 10 minutes in a day, with a day or two in between. Within a few weeks, I was spending a good bit of my evenings with needles clacking.

Since last winter I’ve made myself a hat and scarf, and an infinity scarf for a friend. My daughter Sarah and son-in-law Jordan are having a baby later this month. They live a province away so I am not going to be there with her when the baby is born. I wanted to do something special for them so I knitted a sweater, hat, scarf and blanket for my new grandchild.

The hat has a pumpkin stem, blossom and leaf on the top, and sweater has a leaf and blossom, and so does the blanket. I call it her Pumpkin Layette. I also just mailed her what I called a chakra shawl (named for the colours in it) and a hoodie for the baby with two heart-shaped pockets. One pocket holds a bunny finger puppet and the other has a teddy bear finger puppet stuffed inside.

I’m presently working on hats and scarves for my grandson’s birthdays in the fall.

I’m having a ball, I have to say. The odds have been against me for a long time. I can’t guarantee that there won’t be another cave-in down the road, but so far so good. I have contacted a local group that knits hats for NICU babies in hospitals around the area.

I just heard about knitting club meetings held in my town twice a month. I might even go to one, maybe even more than one.

If you have ME/CFS you know how monumental that really is. I haven’t gone to something like that in years, though I used to do that and far more before I was sick.

I’m toying with the idea of selling some of my knitting. We’ll see how that goes.

So you never know how something might turn out, even if it started badly. Or kept stopping, starting and stopping again. Even if you only started doing it in the first place to save your sanity as you slumped in your rocking chair or flopped in your bed looking down into the abyss.

As I worked my needles that winter 12 years ago, with no more thought than that I wanted to finish the next row, then the next … I could not have hoped that it would lead to the joy and satisfaction I’m finding today.

Have you been surprised by unexpected results that brought you great satisfaction?

 

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{ 44 comments… add one }

  • Jody September 2, 2014, 9:18 pm

    I'm also a member of a knitting group for people with ME/CFS on Facebook. If you are a patient or caregiver who likes to knit, crochet, etc, you can find it at https://www.facebook.com/groups/740860225974533/

  • mermaid September 2, 2014, 9:44 pm

    Thank you for sharing your knitting story. Although I have not been as ill/disabled as you were, I too have restarted knitting and crocheting since I developed ME, and make hats mostly as they are not too big to manage.

    I have even been able to sell some of them over the last few years, but want to also make hats for homeless people. I am thinking also of going to a local knitting group where they knit for charity.

    Thank you for the link to the FB group too.

  • Jody September 2, 2014, 9:45 pm

    Thanks mermaid.

    Knitting is great, isn't it.:)

  • AndyPandy September 2, 2014, 10:27 pm

    The joys of knitting (and crochet) :). I've been a fan since childhood, but haven't been able to do any for a few years until just recently.

    I now do tiny amounts when I can manage it. A few minutes every once in a while and soon a baby beanie is finished.:balloons:

    It's finding the small things that bring joy to my life that help me get through the succession of long difficult days with this illness.

    Best wishes

  • Tammy September 2, 2014, 10:33 pm

    I do not know how to knit but I was just telling a friend of mine that I have got to do something to help pass this time of boredom. I think I could learn at the senior citizen center and would eventually like to make booties, caps, etc. for premie babies……..I used to work as an ICU neonatal nurse and there were never any small enough hats or booties for the really wee ones. So glad Jody that you have found a pastime that you enjoy…………….great! Would like to see some photos if you ever wanted to show some of your work………..especially would like to see what you made for your grandchild.

  • Jody September 2, 2014, 10:47 pm
    AndyPandy

    The joys of knitting (and crochet) :). I've been a fan since childhood, but haven't been able to do any for a few years until just recently.

    I now do tiny amounts when I can manage it. A few minutes every once in a while and soon a baby beanie is finished.:balloons:

    It's finding the small things that bring joy to my life that help me get through the succession of long difficult days with this illness.

    Best wishes

    AndyPandy,

    It's wonderful to come back to something you had to leave and didn't know if you'd ever reclaim it. Makes it that much more sweet. :)

  • xxRinxx September 2, 2014, 10:49 pm

    I knit and crochet too! I just made a hat for my friend, and now I'm knitting a hat for myself when it gets chilly. I got myself a whole lot of yarn last week for christmas projects I have planned. I love knitting and crocheting..it makes me feel like I can accomplish something and not tire myself out, that and you get to give people presents, which is a bonus! I did stuff like this a bit when I wasn't disabled, but since getting ME/cfs and POTS my crafting corner has exploded since I can do everything sitting down. Knitting, Sewing, Crocheting, embellishing clothing, even little house projects. I don't know what I'd do without little hand projects!

  • Jody September 2, 2014, 11:43 pm
    Tammy

    I do not know how to knit but I was just telling a friend of mine that I have got to do something to help pass this time of boredom. I think I could learn at the senior citizen center and would eventually like to make booties, hats, etc. for premie babies……..I used to work as an ICU neonatal nurse and there were never any small enough hats or booties for the really wee ones. So glad Jody that you have found a pastime that you enjoy…………….great! Would like to see some photos if you ever wanted to show some of your work………..especially would like to see what you made for your grandchild.

    Tammy,

    I'll be happy to show you photos. As soon as I figure out how to get them to show up on here.:)

  • Jody September 2, 2014, 11:43 pm
    xxRinxx

    I knit and crochet too! I just made a hat for my friend, and now I'm knitting a hat for myself when it gets chilly. I got myself a whole lot of yarn last week for christmas projects I have planned. I love knitting and crocheting..it makes me feel like I can accomplish something and not tire myself out, that and you get to give people presents, which is a bonus! I did stuff like this a bit when I wasn't disabled, but since getting ME/cfs and POTS my crafting corner has exploded since I can do everything sitting down. Knitting, Sewing, Crocheting, embellishing clothing, even little house projects. I don't know what I'd do without little hand projects!

    xxRinxx,

    I know exactly what you mean. Happy knitting.:)

  • IreneF September 3, 2014, 4:10 am

    I love knitting and crocheting, but my hands have been hurting too much. I have a history of carpal tunnel syndrome. Very frustrating, because I can just sit in a chair and listen to the radio while knitting. I esp. love socks.

  • JAH September 3, 2014, 6:59 am

    I really enjoyed this article, and would welcome other stories in this vein. I think boredom is an under appreciated part of chronic illness. Though knitting isn't my thing, thanks Jody for your well written chronicle of finding a creative outlet to channel the tiny amount of energy you still had.

  • Bob September 3, 2014, 12:49 pm

    I'm not a knitter, but with these Light Sabre knitting needles, who knows where it could lead me?!?:
    http://gizmodo.com/lightsaber-knitting-needles-an-elegant-tool-for-a-more-512407825

  • SDSue September 3, 2014, 4:09 pm

    I love this, Jody. I'm not up to knitting or sewing yet, but I've just regained enough oomph to begin a little painting again.

    It isn't about the finished product; it simply feels amazing to produce something.

    Unraveling your blanket felt sad to me. It seemed such a tangible reminder of progress. But then again, maybe it was more a remnant of the darkest days of ME – the days to which none of us wish to return.

    Here's to more creative endeavors!

  • PennyIA September 3, 2014, 4:19 pm

    I loved this. I, too, found knitting and crocheting again after becoming ill with ME/CFS. There are flare ups where I have to set it aside… but I've learned to really REALLY love how it forces me to stay seated when I'm feeling better and feeling guilty over the undone chores – that if I attempted to do them would just cause a crash. But it engages so many skills – creativity and handwork… and yet, if I need something simple, I can do something simple. If I need a challenge, I can do something more challenging. All from my spot on my bed where I can lay semi-propped up.

    If you haven't spent much time on Ravelry, I invite you to check it out. (Think of it as facebook for knitters). http://www.ravelry.com.

    If you search for the word 'chronic' in the groups, you'll find a few groups of ill members (some with ME, some with EDS, etc) who support each other while also being knitters.

  • Jody September 3, 2014, 5:38 pm
    IreneF

    I love knitting and crocheting, but my hands have been hurting too much. I have a history of carpal tunnel syndrome. Very frustrating, because I can just sit in a chair and listen to the radio while knitting. I esp. love socks.

    Irene F,

    I sympathize. My hands used to be so bad I couldn't hold a pen or take off a tupperware lid. A few things I found helpful —
    Long term, omega-3 (fish) oil (expect to wait at least several weeks for improvement)

    Lymphagen ointment (mostly for lymph-related things but sometimes it would ease the pain in hands and arms (often within 20 min of a first use, or after using a couple of times in a day or over two days. If it didn't do anything by that time, I figured it wasn't going to)

    Castor oil wraps (use once early in the day, once late in the day, an hour each time. No improvement for the first day but subsequent days, if it was going to work it would be noticeable by the second day. just keep going till the pain is gone)

    I was totally crippled, my hands and arms at different times were completely useless. I have been very fortunate to have been restored as much as I have.

  • Jody September 3, 2014, 5:39 pm
    JAH

    I really enjoyed this article, and would welcome other stories in this vein. I think boredom is an under appreciated part of chronic illness. Though knitting isn't my thing, thanks Jody for your well written chronicle of finding a creative outlet to channel the tiny amount of energy you still had.

    JAH,

    The boredom is horrific. People who have not experienced it can't know what boredom is like when it goes on for months and years.

  • Jody September 3, 2014, 5:40 pm
    Bob

    I'm not a knitter, but with these Light Sabre knitting needles, who knows where it could lead me?!?:
    http://gizmodo.com/lightsaber-knitting-needles-an-elegant-tool-for-a-more-512407825

    lol You should definitely go for it. Then write us an article about it.:)

  • Jody September 3, 2014, 5:42 pm
    SDSue

    I love this, Jody. I'm not up to knitting or sewing yet, but I've just regained enough oomph to begin a little painting again.

    It isn't about the finished product; it simply feels amazing to produce something.

    Unraveling your blanket felt sad to me. It seemed such a tangible reminder of progress. But then again, maybe it was more a remnant of the darkest days of ME – the days to which none of us wish to return.

    Here's to more creative endeavors!

    SDSue,

    Painting? That's fantastic. I couldn't do that BEFORE I got sick, let alone now.:)

    Unraveling it was not a sad thing for me, it just felt like it had served its full purpose. It didn't get unravelled until I needed the yarn for another project (a few years later when I could knit again) so It was just being reused. I was delighted to be able to reclaim the yarn for another (more useful) project.:)

  • Jody September 3, 2014, 5:45 pm
    PennyIA

    I loved this. I, too, found knitting and crocheting again after becoming ill with ME/CFS. There are flare ups where I have to set it aside… but I've learned to really REALLY love how it forces me to stay seated when I'm feeling better and feeling guilty over the undone chores – that if I attempted to do them would just cause a crash. But it engages so many skills – creativity and handwork… and yet, if I need something simple, I can do something simple. If I need a challenge, I can do something more challenging. All from my spot on my bed where I can lay semi-propped up.

    If you haven't spent much time on Ravelry, I invite you to check it out. (Think of it as facebook for knitters). http://www.ravelry.com.

    If you search for the word 'chronic' in the groups, you'll find a few groups of ill members (some with ME, some with EDS, etc) who support each other while also being knitters.

    PennyIA,

    You described how it can work for us really well. There aren't many activities that can roll with us in whatever condition we're in that day … or month … not like knitting and crochet can. Very comforting, and stimulating when we want it to be … then when that wears us out, comforting and simple again.:)

    I'll check out Ravelry. Thanks.:)

  • Jody September 3, 2014, 6:23 pm

    This is the Pumpkin Layette I knitted for my daughter Sarah's baby-to-be.
    View attachment 8206

    View attachment 8206 View attachment 8209 View attachment 8210 View attachment 8211

  • Jody September 3, 2014, 6:24 pm

    Looks like I posted one of the photos twice. I'd do it over again but I already did that twice:) and I'm not ready to go through that again.:)

  • SDSue September 3, 2014, 7:01 pm
    Jody

    Painting? That's fantastic. I couldn't do that BEFORE I got sick, let alone now.:)

    I didn't say I painted well. :rofl:;):rofl:

    I'm glad to hear the unraveling wasn't a sad thing for you! As a child, I spent many evenings winding balls of yarn with my mother as she reclaimed unused projects – funny how I disliked it then, but it's a fond memory now!

  • Jody September 3, 2014, 7:05 pm
    SDSue

    I didn't say I painted well. :rofl:;):rofl:

    I'm glad to hear the unraveling wasn't a sad thing for you! As a child, I spent many evenings winding balls of yarn with my mother as she reclaimed unused projects – funny how I disliked it then, but it's a fond memory now!

    I didn't say I knitted well, either.:)

    And that was definitely not the last time I've unravelled a project. Did some last night as a matter of fact.:) One of the great things about knitting is it's so forgiving. If you mess up a sewing project you might have to get more fabric or live with one sleeve shorter than the other. But with knitting, you just rip out the offending stitches and do it again … as many times as it takes.

  • SDSue September 3, 2014, 7:07 pm
    Jody

    I didn't say I knitted well, either.:)

    After seeing your pumpkin layette, I beg to differ!

  • Jody September 3, 2014, 7:11 pm
    SDSue

    After seeing your pumpkin layette, I beg to differ!

    Well, thanks. I have ended up with some pretty strange looking things on occasion. And I just rip out the stitches and start over.:)

  • Jody September 3, 2014, 7:22 pm

    Here are a couple of pictures of the shawl I made for Sarah. It's not a true chakra shawl since I ran out of dark blue and used some navy instead. The colours in the photos aren't quite right. The colour under the red section is actually orange but it looks a funny pink here. And the green looks almost navy in that light.

    I'm happy with it anyway.:)

    View attachment 8212 View attachment 8213

  • Daffodil September 7, 2014, 11:58 am

    Jody…great article! sounds exactly like what I have been through. I too, took up knitting and crocheting for a while. You should try selling on etsy…I love some of the leg warmers/boot socks they have, as well as the fingerless gloves and gorgeous scarves – so many possibilities.

    I was so slow with the knitting, that i preferred sewing. I would make baby dresses and send them to people online with babies…this became an obsession and now i have a large chest full of baby themed cotton fabric I no longer use lol.

    These hobbies saved my life…distracted me at a time when the agony was unbearable. Also, they gave me something to look forward to when there was nothing but despair. After so many years of being unproductive, it felt good to make something!

    xoxo

  • PennyIA September 7, 2014, 4:40 pm
    Daffodil

    After so many years of being unproductive, it felt good to make something!

    It really is a BIG positive to feel like you accomplished something – isn't it? I too find that it makes me feel like I am accomplishing something when there is a such a big list of what I can't do… I love being able to 'do' something.

    When I can't do much – knitting a super-simple hat is my go-to project. All my family has more hats than they need… so now I make them for charity.

  • Daffodil September 7, 2014, 5:23 pm

    That's an awesome shawl. Something like that would take me a year to knit lol

    The baby clothes are ADORABLE!! I LOVE the color choices

  • Daffodil September 7, 2014, 6:09 pm

    here are a few things i made ..very easy stuff…followed patterns
    View attachment 8224 View attachment 8225

    View attachment 8227 View attachment 8228

  • Jody September 8, 2014, 1:26 am
    Daffodil

    Jody…great article! sounds exactly like what I have been through. I too, took up knitting and crocheting for a while. You should try selling on etsy…I love some of the leg warmers/boot socks they have, as well as the fingerless gloves and gorgeous scarves – so many possibilities.

    I was so slow with the knitting, that i preferred sewing. I would make baby dresses and send them to people online with babies…this became an obsession and now i have a large chest full of baby themed cotton fabric I no longer use lol.

    These hobbies saved my life…distracted me at a time when the agony was unbearable. Also, they gave me something to look forward to when there was nothing but despair. After so many years of being unproductive, it felt good to make something!

    xoxo

    Daffodil,

    I wish I could sew. Maybe some day, but for now I'm just not good at it.

    I'd be interested in selling on etsy. Anything I should know?

  • Jody September 8, 2014, 1:27 am
    Daffodil

    That's an awesome shawl. Something like that would take me a year to knit lol

    The baby clothes are ADORABLE!! I LOVE the color choices

    Thanks Daffodil.:)

  • Jody September 8, 2014, 1:28 am
    Daffodil

    here are a few things i made ..very easy stuff…followed patterns
    View attachment 8224 View attachment 8225

    View attachment 8227 View attachment 8228

    Daffodil,

    Your stuff looks great. I could never do something like that and have it turn out right. Beautiful.:)

  • IreneF September 8, 2014, 3:40 am

    I used to sew, esp. when my kids were younger. I made my daughter a couple of the original American Girl dresses, e.g. But now I don't have the energy to even cut anything out, and I make too many mistakes. Really hoping I can do it again sometime.

  • SDSue September 8, 2014, 5:29 am
    Daffodil

    here are a few things i made ..very easy stuff…followed patterns
    View attachment 8224 View attachment 8225

    View attachment 8227 View attachment 8228

    Such lovely things!

    IreneF

    I used to sew, esp. when my kids were younger. I made my daughter a couple of the original American Girl dresses, e.g. But now I don't have the energy to even cut anything out, and I make too many mistakes. Really hoping I can do it again sometime.

    I, too, used to sew quite a bit, and made a few American Girl dresses! Those were the days. I miss sewing dearly.

    The last things I sewed were quilts for my daughters. Looking back, I was sooooo sick – I would work on a quilt for a bit, making many mistakes and becoming so dizzy I would vomit, then end up in bed a few days before trying again. I had NO idea just how sick I was or how much sicker I would become. But I am thankful that if I had to have final projects, they were something lasting for my children.

    I hope someday we are all sewing like crazy again, in between our many other delightful endeavors!

  • PennyIA September 8, 2014, 4:45 pm
    IreneF

    I used to sew, esp. when my kids were younger. I made my daughter a couple of the original American Girl dresses, e.g. But now I don't have the energy to even cut anything out, and I make too many mistakes. Really hoping I can do it again sometime.

    I've never been very good at sewing (me and straight lines have never been in the same place). But part of what I like about knitting is that if I mess up completely, it's pretty easy to rip everything out and start all over… as opposed to sewing, once fabric is cut it can't become uncut.

  • IreneF September 9, 2014, 5:05 am
    PennyIA

    I've never been very good at sewing (me and straight lines have never been in the same place). But part of what I like about knitting is that if I mess up completely, it's pretty easy to rip everything out and start all over… as opposed to sewing, once fabric is cut it can't become uncut.

    We don't need need to talk about those things . . . or we can decide the fabric worked better as a quilt or doll clothes.

  • IreneF September 9, 2014, 5:11 am
    Daffodil

    here are a few things i made ..very easy stuff…followed patterns
    View attachment 8224 View attachment 8225

    View attachment 8227 View attachment 8228

    Those things are really cute. My daughter wants to get married and have kids, but she also wants to go to grad school. I really hope I can be recovered enough to help her once she gets it figured out.

  • Daffodil September 9, 2014, 3:09 pm
    IreneF

    Those things are really cute. My daughter wants to get married and have kids, but she also wants to go to grad school. I really hope I can be recovered enough to help her once she gets it figured out.

    Hi Irene. Thanks! I never got to have kids and I adore babies, so I think that's why I was so drawn to making baby clothes…kind of sad really lol ..I ended up making a ton of stuff but don't have any pictures. You can always make blankets now and save them for when your daughter has babies!

  • IreneF September 10, 2014, 1:35 am

    Kids' things are so much fun to make. My sewing room is slowly coming together. I don't even have the energy to clear off the table, tho.

    My daughter is a good kid. She's had a slow start because of anxiety and adhd, but her bf has really helped her since she moved in with him. She just needs to get her education completed. Unfortunately, she's a bio major, and the labs tend to have toxins, so pregnancy would be unwise. I told her I would help her out if I could, but that's really asking for a miracle at this point.

  • Jody September 19, 2014, 2:41 pm
    PennyIA

    I've never been very good at sewing (me and straight lines have never been in the same place). But part of what I like about knitting is that if I mess up completely, it's pretty easy to rip everything out and start all over… as opposed to sewing, once fabric is cut it can't become uncut.

    lol That's me, exactly! :)

  • August59 February 11, 2015, 3:46 am

    Activity like knitting probably stimulates many muscles from fingers, hands, arms, shoulders, neck, back and etc…….

    Even with just 10 minutes it probably exerts a minor effect on metabolic rate, in someone with S.E.I.D.!!!!!!! I imagine that this minor effect can be therapeutic for many of us. I squeeze a stress ball several times a day and contract/flex my feet as well.

    Even what most people would consider trivial can be therapeutic for people with S.E.I.D. (this to hard to type!!!)

  • Folky girl March 19, 2015, 5:11 am

    Thanks for the article. I can very much relate! Knitting has made me feel like I'm achieving something when I otherwise can't even do basic things. It has been a sanity saver many times, including during hospital stays. I'm a songwriter and have written a song about knitting with ME/CFS. (I'm not trying to make any money, you can listen for free)

    It's here https://naomiflanagan.bandcamp.com/track/love-in-angora-2

  • Jody July 6, 2015, 1:05 am
    Folky girl

    Thanks for the article. I can very much relate! Knitting has made me feel like I'm achieving something when I otherwise can't even do basic things. It has been a sanity saver many times, including during hospital stays. I'm a songwriter and have written a song about knitting with ME/CFS. (I'm not trying to make any money, you can listen for free)

    It's here https://naomiflanagan.bandcamp.com/track/love-in-angora-2

    Folky girl,

    There is nothing quite like knitting for reclaiming a sense of peace … or at least a semblance of it.

    That's wonderful that you are able to write songs.:)