Vertigo: Unwelcome Gift on My 25th Wedding Anniversary

May 17, 2013

by Jody Smith

pixabay-winter-storm

I’ll always remember my 25th wedding anniversary as being something special. I wish I could say that this was because my husband and I celebrated in some marvelous fashion, but that wasn’t it. At the age of 49, I thought I was having a stroke.

I got up that morning feeling fine — or no worse than usual at any rate — but when I went to my bedroom to get dressed all that changed. Waves of sensory chaos began to crash over me, and I sat on the bed waiting for it to pass. It didn’t. I’d had a wide variety of sensory chaos and problems with my brain for many years by that time, but this was different.

I had the strangest feeling that I — the inner I — was somehow disappearing. And I felt an urgent need to not be alone for this terrifying experience.

Normally it’s probably less than a minute’s walk from my bedroom to the living room. But normally the walls are not moving in and out and the floor was not usually coming up to meet me in waves. I don’t know how long it took me to grope my way down this hallway but it seemed to take forever.

I staggered into the living room and saw my husband Alan sitting there. My sense of relief was so great that I almost wept. He saw immediately that something was very wrong as I stumbled over to the couch and collapsed on it, staring wordlessly at him. Wordless because I couldn’t talk and couldn’t form words in my head. He spoke to me. I couldn’t comprehend what he said.

Stroke?

Was I having a stroke? We were both familiar with some of the symptoms, and these seemed to fit.

Trouble walking? Check.

Trouble speaking? Check.

Trouble understanding? Check.

Numbness and weakness in face, arms and legs? Check, check and check.

Problems with vision? Check.

What I was seeing looked fractured, movement seemed choppy. I think my peripheral vision may have disappeared because I felt like I was in a dark cave though the room was normally lighted.

My mother happened to come by a few minutes later, ironically to see if she could talk me into giving my doctor another try at finding out what was wrong with me. She wasn’t prepared for what she walked in on. She called my doctor’s office to try to get me in right away, telling them I might be having a stroke. The office receptionist said to bring me in. Alan would stay home with the kids.

The doctor was patronizing. He smiled and said I wasn’t having a stroke. When he checked my blood pressure though, the numbers were through the roof, and that wiped the smile off his face. I was still enough myself to get some real pleasure out of his surprise. He thought I was overreacting? He should try it from the inside.

He sent me immediately to the nearest hospital for tests. I didn’t know if I would be going back home that day … or ever.

As it turned out, all my test results were normal. Except for those troubling blood pressure numbers in the doctor’s office, everything indicated that I was the picture of health. Even though I was poured into my bed after the hospital tests, and basically stayed there for the next four months.

Later I realized that I had been hit with an extreme and long-lasting case of vertigo. It improved quite a bit over a period of months but it took seven years to disappear. I did some reading while I was convalescing and saw that I’d probably been dealing with some mild vertigo for a number of years without knowing it, that some of what I would have called ME/CFS symptoms were vertigo symptoms.

What is Vertigo?

MedlinePlus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health describes vertigo as a “sensation of motion or spinning that is often described as dizziness.” They specify that vertigo is not light-headedness. If you have vertigo you may feel as though you are moving or spinning, or as though the world around you is spinning.

The NHS Choices website, supported by the UK Department of Health, says “If you have vertigo, you may feel as if you’re moving even when you’re standing completely still.” A vertigo episode can last just for seconds, or it can be longer, whether minutes, hours, days, weeks or years.

If you have vertigo you may feel a spinning sensation that can leave you nauseous, and may make you vomit. You might have problems getting your eyes to focus. You may lose hearing in one ear. Perhaps you’ll feel a loss of balance, even to the point of falling down. You may experience tinnitis, which is ringing in the ears.

Peripheral Vertigo

Peripheral vertigo is caused by issues with areas of the inner ear (the vestibular labyrinth or semicircular canals) that regulate balance. The vestibular nerve, connecting the inner ear to the brainstem, may also play a role.

Peripheral vertigo can be set off by a number of different possible causes. Some of these are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (triggered by position changes), and injuries such as head trauma. Neuronitis (vestibular nerve inflammation), labyrinthitis and Menier’s disease can cause peripheral vertigo, as can pressure against the vestibular nerve. Some medications like aminoglycoside antibiotics, cisplatin, diuretics, or salicylates can trigger peripheral vertigo.

Central Vertigo

Central vertigo can result from a problem in the brainstem, the cerebellum (in the back of the brain) or other parts of the brain. It can cause double vision, facial paralysis. You may have problems with eye movement, and swallowing can be difficult. Speech may be slurred. Your arms and legs may experience weakness.

Central vertigo has several possible causes. Migraines, multiple sclerosis, stroke, and rarely seizures can result in central vertigo symptoms. Tumors that are usually noncancerous, and disease affecting blood vessels may cause this type of vertigo as well. Some medications like anticonvulsants, aspirin and alcohol can also be triggers.

Just another wastebasket diagnosis?

Did it help to be able to say I had vertigo rather than chalking it all up to a vague (non)diagnosis of ME/CFS? Not really. I came to understand that vertigo can be something of a wastebasket diagnosis too. Plenty of people live with vertigo for years with no idea as to its cause, and no idea how to make it stop.

In another way though, I think it made me feel a bit better. At least some of my symptoms were pretty common — more common than I’d realized before I got hit with vertigo. And telling people I had vertigo got a different reaction than saying I had ME/CFS. It got no more understanding, but people tended to believe that maybe something was wrong after all. It didn’t help my condition but sometimes it made me feel more normal despite being so unwell.

Further Reading

Happy Anniversay You’re Going to the Hospital: 2004
http://www.ncubator.ca/Anniversary.html

Vertigo and the Healing Power of Books
http://www.ncubator.ca/Vertigo_Healing_Books.html

Vertigo — Hallucination of the Inner Ear
http://www.ncubator.ca/Vertigo_Hallucination.html

Spring of /05 : Crawling Out of Vertigo
http://www.ncubator.ca/Crawling_Vertigo.html

Stroke: Symptoms
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/stroke/DS00150/DSECTION=symptoms

Vertigo-associated disorders
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001432.htm

Vertigo
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Vertigo/Pages/Introduction.aspx

 

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19 comments

{ 19 comments… read them below or add one }

Valentijn May 17, 2013 at 7:32 am

Great article. Not surprised about the doctor's first reaction – surely a middle aged woman couldn't have a serious health problem! :p

Vertigo is a rare problem for me. I had it badly during the infection that preceded my ME symptoms, and then just one or two other brief episodes. Oh, and several minutes of intense spinning 5 years prior to getting sick, when a neurologist had me try folic acid for a hemiplegic migraine – the migraine did go away once the spinning stopped :D

Sparrow May 17, 2013 at 10:19 am

I don't know if it will apply to anyone else, but since we all tend to be prone to taking supplements, I'll mention it anyway just in case.

I've had a few bouts of vertigo, which was really scary. Dizziness, room spinning, double vision, etc. But for me, most of them at least were related to too much zinc in my system. Vertigo can be a side effect of taking way too much zinc. I wasn't. I took a very reasonable amount (15mg), far away from the level that's it's supposed to be possible to trigger those symptoms. But for whatever reasons, during the time of my bad crash, my body just couldn't handle it. Little bit of zinc meant little bit of vertigo. More zinc meant more vertigo. I even got it a couple of times after eating a bunch of pork or walnuts (both high in zinc).

Anyway, so long as I keep my zinc intake down (I can tolerate a little over 10mg now, spread out through the day, but no more), no more vertigo. Just wanted to mention in case I'm not the only one whose body is doing unexpected things with zinc. Cutting out zinc intake for a while might at least be one more thing for people having vertigo to try.

(Note: I think zinc is great. Really important. I'm not anti-zinc at all. …Just my body is.;))

Jody May 17, 2013 at 12:44 pm


Valentijn

Great article. Not surprised about the doctor's first reaction – surely a middle aged woman couldn't have a serious health problem! :p

Vertigo is a rare problem for me. I had it badly during the infection that preceded my ME symptoms, and then just one or two other brief episodes. Oh, and several minutes of intense spinning 5 years prior to getting sick, when a neurologist had me try folic acid for a hemiplegic migraine – the migraine did go away once the spinning stopped :D

Valentijn,

It's a good symptom to be missing out on.:) I'm glad you haven't run into it much.

I think my doctor's reaction was more along the lines of — middle aged woman, another one who's prone to imagining and exaggerating symptoms. This guy retired a few years ago for which I am very thankful.

Jody May 17, 2013 at 12:46 pm


Sparrow

I don't know if it will apply to anyone else, but since we all tend to be prone to taking supplements, I'll mention it anyway just in case.

I've had a few bouts of vertigo, which was really scary. Dizziness, room spinning, double vision, etc. But for me, most of them at least were related to too much zinc in my system. Vertigo can be a side effect of taking way too much zinc. I wasn't. I took a very reasonable amount (15mg), far away from the level that's it's supposed to be possible to trigger those symptoms. But for whatever reasons, during the time of my bad crash, my body just couldn't handle it. Little bit of zinc meant little bit of vertigo. More zinc meant more vertigo. I even got it a couple of times after eating a bunch of pork or walnuts (both high in zinc).

Anyway, so long as I keep my zinc intake down (I can tolerate a little over 10mg now, spread out through the day, but no more), no more vertigo. Just wanted to mention in case I'm not the only one whose body is doing unexpected things with zinc. Cutting out zinc intake for a while might at least be one more thing for people having vertigo to try.

(Note: I think zinc is great. Really important. I'm not anti-zinc at all. …Just my body is.;))

Sparrow,

It's always useful to hear of potential side effects when taking too much of something. I hadn't been taking zinc myself at that time. Still have no idea what set it all off — but hey, why should vertigo be any different from all the other mysterious symptoms that crop up? :)

Crux May 17, 2013 at 1:22 pm

Thanks Jody;
It's bad enough to experience vertigo, but to be patronized about it…unprofessional, but common. ( the shortcomings of some doctors.)
I guess I'm lucky to have found my vertigo is from B12 deficiency, otherwise, I'd be unable to function. Although there are other causes, such as tumors, infections, etc., vertigo, is one of the neurological symptoms of low B12.

I hope we don't pass that way again!

Jody May 17, 2013 at 2:40 pm

Crux,

I need B12 to function too, I have discovered. Vertigo hit in 2004, I started taking B12 at a naturopath's recommendation 2 yrs later.

I'm with you — let's not pass that way again.:)

Rrrr May 17, 2013 at 9:24 pm

Wow. great article, as i deal with the exact same issue — jumpy vision and weird brain related vision issues. and my brain has never "compensated" since the initial injury 4.5 yrs ago.

so for you it resolved after a few years? (that gives me great hope!) can you remind me, how many years did you say it took for you to resolve it, and HOW did you resolve it?

i have had horrible vestibular issues (jumpy vision and just weird vision/brain issues) for 4.5 years with no relief from it — ever. often can't drive, and sometimes can't walk without holding on to walls or another person. sometimes it gets worse for a few hours or weeks or months (!!!) at a time. but even when it is at its mildest "baseline," things are still all weird and "off" in my brain/vision. i have seen top neurologists and none of them can figure out why my vision/brain has not returned to normal yet.

but i MAY have figured it out, just last week. i did more research recently (last wk), and i just posted about it on another thread on this forum (a FAMVIR/antiviral thread). this is what i posted, see below:

1) THE HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS (HSV) CAUSES VESTIBULAR NEURITIS (VISION/VERTIGO ISSUES)
- Days ago I was shocked to learn that HSV is a leading cause of vestibular neuritis! See this paper, especially citations #43-52, which list published studies that found HSV causes vestibular issues: http://www.tampabayhearing.com/vestibularneuritis.php#21

and at the same time, see this:
2) FIBRO RESEARCHERS FINDING THAT HSV MAY CAUSE FIBRO AND CFS
http://www.prohealth.com/library/showarticle.cfm?libid=17194
http://research.ua.edu/2012/08/going-viral-surgeon-professor-team-in-new-approach-to-pain-treatment/

so that means taking an antiviral could be a "two-fer" killing to birds with one stone. see this:
3) TWO-FER: ANTIVIRAL PROTOCOL TO ADDRESS BOTH VESTIBULAR AND ME/CFS?
- See the enclosed case study of 1 patient who took HSV for her oral herpes (HSV) outbreaks and, lo and behold, her recurrences of vestibular neuritis resolved. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22154065
- The researchers in my #2 above point think this exact same virus (HSV) is what causes Fibro and ME/CFS.
- In other words, an antiviral protocol to address HSV could help both vestibular issues and ME/CFS.
- And if not HSV, it could be another virus that causes both the ME/CFS and the vestibular issues. E.g. I recently tested high for Epstein Barr Virus and HHV6, which is why I'm going to take Famvir. I hope it helps my vestibular issues (jumpy vision) too.

Sparrow May 17, 2013 at 10:05 pm


Jody

It's always useful to hear of potential side effects when taking too much of something. I hadn't been taking zinc myself at that time. Still have no idea what set it all off — but hey, why should vertigo be any different from all the other mysterious symptoms that crop up? :)

Seriously. I'm pretty sure nothing could surprise me anymore. Suddenly sprouting dog tails out of my arm? Oh. Okay. Guess I need some new shirts now.

I was assuming zinc intake probably isn't the root cause for most people, but I figured I'd mention it anyway just in case it made the difference for somebody out there. Of course, they don't even actually know why really high zinc doses cause that side effect (there are some theories that it's something to do with copper, or various other things), so who even knows whether it was my body being weird about zinc or my body being weird about something else that just happened to be triggered by it. :rolleyes:

Valentijn May 18, 2013 at 1:18 am


Sparrow

Of course, they don't even actually know why really high zinc doses cause that side effect (there are some theories that it's something to do with copper, or various other things), so who even knows whether it was my body being weird about zinc or my body being weird about something else that just happened to be triggered by it. :rolleyes:

From what I've read, zinc and copper use the same binding(?) mechanism, and zinc will hog it if there's "too much" zinc. My intracellular zinc isn't high, but my intracellular copper is hella low, so I end up with a zinc/copper ratio of 87.1 with a normal range of 9-16. So maybe there's a problem with the availability of the binding mechanism.

Ah, here's the article at http://www.livestrong.com/article/504502-nutrition-the-zinc-to-copper-ratio/ . Basically too much zinc means you make more metallothionein, which binds both copper and zinc, but prefers copper. So the copper gets trapped in the intestines instead of being absorbed.

m1she11e May 18, 2013 at 7:56 am

Vertigo is one of my issues that I dislike the most. It came on suddenly about 20 years into my illness. I had some tests run and it turns out I have both kinds of Vertigo you spoke of. I cant figure out my triggers but I have had it completely go away for years and then come back suddenly.

What I have found is that I have pressure in my spine and behind my eyes days before it happens. I have difficulty moving my eyes as well. It feels like there is swelling in my brain and spine. I usually ice my spine and base of my skill and take ibuprophen if I feel an episode coming on. I also get very tired and my heart races like crazy. The whole thing is AWFUL!!!

New paint and other chemicals are a trigger but I am not sure what else is.

Im taking a multil level supplement called Protandim now. Since taking it (and I started when Vertigo was a monthly issue for about 2 weeks at a time) I no longer get Vertigo. I stopped the supplement and within months it came back. It boost Glutathione and is also very antiflammatory. I know we all waste so much on supplements but this one works on my Vertigo. I will still get the eye pressure and feel unsteady but it is short lasting and full Vertigo has not come on for a year now.

Good luck to you! This is not a fun one to deal with!!!

Michelle

Mij May 18, 2013 at 9:21 am


Rrrr

Wow. great article, as i deal with the exact same issue — jumpy vision and weird brain related vision issues. and my brain has never "compensated" since the initial injury 4.5 yrs ago.

so for you it resolved after a few years? (that gives me great hope!) can you remind me, how many years did you say it took for you to resolve it, and HOW did you resolve it?

i have had horrible vestibular issues (jumpy vision and just weird vision/brain issues) for 4.5 years with no relief from it — ever. often can't drive, and sometimes can't walk without holding on to walls or another person. sometimes it gets worse for a few hours or weeks or months (!!!) at a time. but even when it is at its mildest "baseline," things are still all weird and "off" in my brain/vision. i have seen top neurologists and none of them can figure out why my vision/brain has not returned to normal yet.

but i MAY have figured it out, just last week. i did more research recently (last wk), and i just posted about it on another thread on this forum (a FAMVIR/antiviral thread). this is what i posted, see below:

1) THE HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS (HSV) CAUSES VESTIBULAR NEURITIS (VISION/VERTIGO ISSUES)
- Days ago I was shocked to learn that HSV is a leading cause of vestibular neuritis! See this paper, especially citations #43-52, which list published studies that found HSV causes vestibular issues: http://www.tampabayhearing.com/vestibularneuritis.php#21

and at the same time, see this:
2) FIBRO RESEARCHERS FINDING THAT HSV MAY CAUSE FIBRO AND CFS
http://www.prohealth.com/library/showarticle.cfm?libid=17194
http://research.ua.edu/2012/08/going-viral-surgeon-professor-team-in-new-approach-to-pain-treatment/

so that means taking an antiviral could be a "two-fer" killing to birds with one stone. see this:
3) TWO-FER: ANTIVIRAL PROTOCOL TO ADDRESS BOTH VESTIBULAR AND ME/CFS?
- See the enclosed case study of 1 patient who took HSV for her oral herpes (HSV) outbreaks and, lo and behold, her recurrences of vestibular neuritis resolved. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22154065
- The researchers in my #2 above point think this exact same virus (HSV) is what causes Fibro and ME/CFS.
- In other words, an antiviral protocol to address HSV could help both vestibular issues and ME/CFS.
- And if not HSV, it could be another virus that causes both the ME/CFS and the vestibular issues. E.g. I recently tested high for Epstein Barr Virus and HHV6, which is why I'm going to take Famvir. I hope it helps my vestibular issues (jumpy vision) too.

My sudden onset was severe vertigo upon wakening, felt like my eyes did a 360 in my head. I also thought I was having a stroke. Was a complete healthy person 1 second before that happened. For me the vertigo is virally induced, still comes and goes.

Rrrr May 18, 2013 at 3:11 pm

wow. we all have the same thing going on! i did not know it was so common in ME/CFS, but apparently it is.

rrrr

Helle Nielsen May 20, 2013 at 3:58 am

Thank you for your article. It made me connect some knowledge.
The ion channel TRPA1 is expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root, trigeminal and nodose ganglia, and in hair cells of the inner ear. I have a hypothesis that regulation of TRPA1 is involved in some of the complex biochemistry in ME and comorbidities. I have written several posts about this http://followmeindenmark.blogspot.dk/. I wonder if TRPA1 function also may be involved in vertigo? TRPA1´s role in the inner ear is described here http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21204497
Sparrow answered that zink could trigger her vertigo. Zinc activates TRPA1 ion channels and modulate sensory transmission. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2677965/ Maybe a coincidence!?! But I like to notice these remarks to be inspired to seek more knowledge.
Best regards Helle

EtherSpin May 20, 2013 at 2:59 pm

I experience something like this, when it occurs Im so disoriented I walk into a room and even though Im still walking can not perceive much between the door im about to walk into and then actually being inside the room,to make a video game analogy, its a bit like having a super low framerate on reality but then throw in a little blurriness, loss of peripheral vision and often light and noise sensitivity

Jody May 20, 2013 at 5:51 pm


Rrrr

Wow. great article, as i deal with the exact same issue — jumpy vision and weird brain related vision issues. and my brain has never "compensated" since the initial injury 4.5 yrs ago.

so for you it resolved after a few years? (that gives me great hope!) can you remind me, how many years did you say it took for you to resolve it, and HOW did you resolve it?

i have had horrible vestibular issues (jumpy vision and just weird vision/brain issues) for 4.5 years with no relief from it — ever. often can't drive, and sometimes can't walk without holding on to walls or another person. sometimes it gets worse for a few hours or weeks or months (!!!) at a time. but even when it is at its mildest "baseline," things are still all weird and "off" in my brain/vision. i have seen top neurologists and none of them can figure out why my vision/brain has not returned to normal yet.

but i MAY have figured it out, just last week. i did more research recently (last wk), and i just posted about it on another thread on this forum (a FAMVIR/antiviral thread). this is what i posted, see below:

1) THE HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS (HSV) CAUSES VESTIBULAR NEURITIS (VISION/VERTIGO ISSUES)
- Days ago I was shocked to learn that HSV is a leading cause of vestibular neuritis! See this paper, especially citations #43-52, which list published studies that found HSV causes vestibular issues: http://www.tampabayhearing.com/vestibularneuritis.php#21

and at the same time, see this:
2) FIBRO RESEARCHERS FINDING THAT HSV MAY CAUSE FIBRO AND CFS
http://www.prohealth.com/library/showarticle.cfm?libid=17194
http://research.ua.edu/2012/08/going-viral-surgeon-professor-team-in-new-approach-to-pain-treatment/

so that means taking an antiviral could be a "two-fer" killing to birds with one stone. see this:
3) TWO-FER: ANTIVIRAL PROTOCOL TO ADDRESS BOTH VESTIBULAR AND ME/CFS?
- See the enclosed case study of 1 patient who took HSV for her oral herpes (HSV) outbreaks and, lo and behold, her recurrences of vestibular neuritis resolved. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22154065
- The researchers in my #2 above point think this exact same virus (HSV) is what causes Fibro and ME/CFS.
- In other words, an antiviral protocol to address HSV could help both vestibular issues and ME/CFS.
- And if not HSV, it could be another virus that causes both the ME/CFS and the vestibular issues. E.g. I recently tested high for Epstein Barr Virus and HHV6, which is why I'm going to take Famvir. I hope it helps my vestibular issues (jumpy vision) too.

Rrrr,

It hit at the end of 2004, gradually decreasing and finally being gone (or at least enough to be pretty functional) by the end of 2009. I'm not sure what all contributed to the improvement. Alot of rest helped. I started taking omega-3 oil which is supposed to be good for central nervous system — all cells need to be coated with omega-3 fatty acids. This may have helped straighten out the confusion caused by faulty messaging which contributes to the vertigo.

I got stuck at a stage where I could feel it in my right ear (can't explain that, but I could feel it). I had occasional ticking in that ear … like you might hear from a watch that needs winding. In fact I thought that was what I was hearing till I realized there was no such clock or watch nearby. This would come and go. My naturopath suggested nasal lavage, like you'd do with a neti pot. I had a turkey baster.) Important not to use tap water as that can be dangerous. Lots of stuff on line about how to do this safely and properly.

I'd blow my nose after doing this and would hear a "squeak" in my right ear. So maybe an accumulation of unsavoury stuff in the sinuses in the right side of my face. After doing this treatment for a few weeks, the squeak went away, … and the last of the bad vertigo also disappeared.

I was also taking a tincture that had natural antiviral and antibacterial properties, drank water and chlorophyll which helps clear toxins, used Lymphagen around my glands/ears which helps to keep lymph moving — would clear sore throats and ear aches fairly well.

Those are the things that I can recall just now that I think contributed to decreasing vertigo.

Jody May 20, 2013 at 5:56 pm


m1she11e

Vertigo is one of my issues that I dislike the most. It came on suddenly about 20 years into my illness. I had some tests run and it turns out I have both kinds of Vertigo you spoke of. I cant figure out my triggers but I have had it completely go away for years and then come back suddenly.

What I have found is that I have pressure in my spine and behind my eyes days before it happens. I have difficulty moving my eyes as well. It feels like there is swelling in my brain and spine. I usually ice my spine and base of my skill and take ibuprophen if I feel an episode coming on. I also get very tired and my heart races like crazy. The whole thing is AWFUL!!!

New paint and other chemicals are a trigger but I am not sure what else is.

Im taking a multil level supplement called Protandim now. Since taking it (and I started when Vertigo was a monthly issue for about 2 weeks at a time) I no longer get Vertigo. I stopped the supplement and within months it came back. It boost Glutathione and is also very antiflammatory. I know we all waste so much on supplements but this one works on my Vertigo. I will still get the eye pressure and feel unsteady but it is short lasting and full Vertigo has not come on for a year now.

Good luck to you! This is not a fun one to deal with!!!

Michelle

Michelle,

One of the things that will bring it on temporarily is sensory overload, having to do too much in a short time, multitasking longer than I can handle, working with numbers for very long … :) My impression is it's tied to sympathetic nervous system overdrive for too long, adrenals being overworked … that kind of thing.

In those cases the only way to stop it is to get somewhere away from stimuli, quit thinking, maybe lay down. Also maybe eat some protein and fats if it's been too long without something to eat.

It's often accompanied by a roaring in my ears and a feeling of pressure and fullness in my ears and neck, seemingly around the glands under my ears … and a corresponding inability to think even about the simplest things. As the vertigo recedes so does the roaring and pressure.

Jody May 20, 2013 at 5:57 pm


Mij

My sudden onset was severe vertigo upon wakening, felt like my eyes did a 360 in my head. I also thought I was having a stroke. Was a complete healthy person 1 second before that happened. For me the vertigo is virally induced, still comes and goes.

Mine was also sudden onset, seemingly out of nowhere. One minute doing ok, the next … not.

Jody May 20, 2013 at 5:58 pm


EtherSpin

I experience something like this, when it occurs Im so disoriented I walk into a room and even though Im still walking can not perceive much between the door im about to walk into and then actually being inside the room,to make a video game analogy, its a bit like having a super low framerate on reality but then throw in a little blurriness, loss of peripheral vision and often light and noise sensitivity

Yeah, that sounds very like what it did to me.

Jody May 20, 2013 at 6:00 pm


m1she11e

Vertigo is one of my issues that I dislike the most. It came on suddenly about 20 years into my illness. I had some tests run and it turns out I have both kinds of Vertigo you spoke of. I cant figure out my triggers but I have had it completely go away for years and then come back suddenly.

What I have found is that I have pressure in my spine and behind my eyes days before it happens. I have difficulty moving my eyes as well. It feels like there is swelling in my brain and spine. I usually ice my spine and base of my skill and take ibuprophen if I feel an episode coming on. I also get very tired and my heart races like crazy. The whole thing is AWFUL!!!

New paint and other chemicals are a trigger but I am not sure what else is.

Im taking a multil level supplement called Protandim now. Since taking it (and I started when Vertigo was a monthly issue for about 2 weeks at a time) I no longer get Vertigo. I stopped the supplement and within months it came back. It boost Glutathione and is also very antiflammatory. I know we all waste so much on supplements but this one works on my Vertigo. I will still get the eye pressure and feel unsteady but it is short lasting and full Vertigo has not come on for a year now.

Good luck to you! This is not a fun one to deal with!!!

Michelle

Michelle,

Just remembered something more. Going into an unfamiliar place can also trigger it. It's as if my brain (or whatever) an deal with familiar places, on automatic so to speak. But when it has to learn a new place, and has to navigate it for the first time, my messaging systems become confused and chaotic.

This does not happen to me as much as it used to, but it can still take me by surprise. When it does it affects my movements, my speech center, and my ability to comprehend language.

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